Berkeley Students Jason Michael Fauss, Jas Hora, and Aaron Nicholas camping out to hear the Supreme Court's ruling on DOMA and Prop 8, June 27th, 2013. Today the Supreme Court declined to hear cases from 5 states, effectively legalizing same sex marriage in Indiana, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin - and setting up many more states to have their gay marriage bans overturned. Source: New York Times
Berkeley Students Jason Michael Fauss, Jas Hora, and Aaron Nicholas camping out to hear the Supreme Court’s ruling on DOMA and Prop 8, June 27th, 2013. Today the Supreme Court declined to hear cases from 5 states, effectively legalizing same sex marriage in Indiana, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin – and setting up many more states to have their gay marriage bans overturned.
Source: New York Times

Will the Supreme Court one day rule on same-sex marriage nationwide? Suddenly the answer is looking to be no. In a surprise move, the Supreme Court today announced they “let stand appeals court rulings allowing such unions in five states.” Via The New York Times:

The decision to let the appeals court rulings stand, which came without explanation in a series of brief orders, will almost immediately increase the number of states allowing same-sex marriage from 19 to 24, along with the District of Columbia. The impact of the move will in short order be even broader.

Monday’s orders let stand decisions from three federal appeals courts with jurisdiction over six other states that ban same-sex marriage: Colorado, Kansas, North Carolina, South Carolina, West Virginia and Wyoming. Those appeals courts will almost certainly follow their own precedents to strike down those additional bans as well, meaning the number of states with same-sex marriage should soon climb to 30.